Name
FA Cup

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Poster


Established
1871 (149 years old)

First Recorded Event
2014-05-17

Current Season
2020-2021

API Football ID
2791

Sport
Soccer

Location
United Kingdom

Gender
Male

Alternate Names
Football Association Cup
The Emirates FA Cup

Last Edit
Ovokx: 30 Aug 2020
Site
Home / Sport / Soccer / FA Cup

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Upcoming Events
24 Oct 20 Canvey  -  Cray Wanderers
24 Oct 20 Wealdstone  -  Hayes & Yeading
24 Oct 20 Sutton United  -  Bromley
24 Oct 20 Tonbridge Angel  -  Taunton Town
24 Oct 20 Hemel Hempstead  -  Hampton & Richm
24 Oct 20 Aldershot  -  Woking
24 Oct 20 Maldon & Tiptre  -  Haringey Boroug
24 Oct 20 Dagenham & Red.  -  Hartley Wintney
24 Oct 20 Weymouth  -  Oxford City
24 Oct 20 Eastbourne Boro  -  Dulwich Hamlet

Latest Results
13 Oct 20 Christchurch 1 - 1  Dulwich Hamlet
13 Oct 20 Cray Valley PM 2 - 0  Aveley
13 Oct 20 Southport 1 - 1  South Shields
13 Oct 20 Chester City 3 - 1  Spennymoor Town
13 Oct 20 Farsley Celtic 1 - 3  AFC Fylde
13 Oct 20 Chorley 1 - 0  York
13 Oct 20 Guiseley 2 - 0  Matlock
13 Oct 20 FC United of Ma 0 - 0  Alfreton Town
13 Oct 20 St Albans City 1 - 1  Mickleover Spor
13 Oct 20 Braintree Town 0 - 1  Maldon & Tiptre

Description
Available in:

The FA Cup, known officially as The Football Association Challenge Cup, is an annual knockout football competition in men's domestic English football. First played during the 1871–72 season, it is the oldest national football competition in the world. It is organised by and named after The Football Association (The FA). For sponsorship reasons, from 2015 through to 2018 it is also known as The Emirates FA Cup. A concurrent women's tournament is also held, the FA Women's Cup.

The competition is open to any eligible club down to Level 10 of the English football league system – all 92 professional clubs in the Premier League (Level 1) and the English Football League (Levels 2 to 4), and several hundred "non-league" teams in Steps 1 to 6 of the National League System (Levels 5 to 10). A record 763 clubs competed in 2011–12. The tournament consists of 12 randomly drawn rounds followed by the semi-finals and the final. Entrants are not seeded, although a system of byes based on league level ensures higher ranked teams enter in later rounds – the minimum number of games needed to win the competition ranges from six to fourteen.

The first six rounds are the Qualifying Competition, from which 32 teams progress to the first round of the Competition Proper, meeting the first of the 48 professional teams from Leagues One and Two. The last entrants are the Premier League and Championship clubs, into the draw for the Third Round Proper. In the modern era, only one non-league team has ever reached the quarter-finals, and teams below Level 2 have never reached the final. As a result, as well as who wins, significant focus is given to those "minnows" (smaller teams) who progress furthest, especially if they achieve an unlikely "giant-killing" victory.

Winners receive the FA Cup trophy, of which there have been two designs and five actual cups; the latest is a 2014 replica of the second design, introduced in 1911. Winners also qualify for the Europa League and a place in the FA Community Shield match. Chelsea are the current holders, having beaten Manchester United 1–0 in the 2018 final. Arsenal are the most successful club with 13 titles. Arsenal's Arsène Wenger is the most successful manager in the competition with seven finals won.

History
In 1863, the newly founded Football Association (the FA) published the Laws of the Game of Association Football, unifying the various different rules in use before then. On 20 July 1871, in the offices of The Sportsman newspaper, the FA Secretary C. W. Alcock proposed to the FA committee that "it is desirable that a Challenge Cup should be established in connection with the Association for which all clubs belonging to the Association should be invited to compete". The inaugural FA Cup tournament kicked off in November 1871. After thirteen games in all, Wanderers were crowned the winners in the final, on 16 March 1872. Wanderers retained the trophy the following year. The modern cup was beginning to be established by the 1888–89 season, when qualifying rounds were introduced.

Following the 1914–15 edition, the competition was suspended due to the First World War, and did not resume until 1919–20. The 1922–23 competition saw the first final to be played in the newly opened Wembley Stadium (known at the time as the Empire Stadium). Due to the outbreak of World War II, the competition was not played between the 1938–39 and 1945–46 editions. Due to the wartime breaks, the competition did not celebrate its centenary year until 1980–81; fittingly the final featured a goal by Ricky Villa which was later voted the greatest goal ever scored at Wembley Stadium, but has since been replaced by Steven Gerrard.

Having previously featured replays, the modern day practice of ensuring the semi-final and final matches finish on the day, was introduced from 2000 onwards. Redevelopment of Wembley saw the final played outside of England for the first time, the 2001–2006 finals being played at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. The final returned to Wembley in 2007, followed by the semi-finals from 2008.

Seasons

2013-2014

2014-2015

2016-2017

2017-2018

2018-2019

2019-2020

2020-2021

Teams

AFC Fylde
-1

Altrincham
-9

Arsenal

Ascot United
-11

Aston Villa

Barnsley

Barrow
-6

Birmingham

Blackburn

Bolton

Bournemouth

Brentford

Brentwood Town
-11

Brighton

Bristol City

Burnley

Cardiff

Charlton

Chelsea

Chorley
-9

Christchurch
-11

Coventry

Cray Valley PM
-11

Crewe

Crystal Palace

Derby

Ebbsfleet Unite
-10

Edgware Town
-11

Everton

Faversham Town
-11

Fulham

Harrogate Town
-9

Hashtag United
-11

Huddersfield Town

Hull

Kings Lynn Town
-11

Leeds

Leicester

Liverpool

Luton

Maine Road
-11

Man City

Man United

Middlesbrough

Millwall

Needham Market
-11

New Salamis
-11

Newcastle

Northampton

Norwich

Nottingham F.

Preston

QPR

Reading

Rotherham

Sheffield United

Sheffield Weds

Soham Town Rang
-11

Southampton

Southend

Squires Gate
-11

Stevenage

Stoke

Swansea

Swindon

Tottenham

Tranmere

Watford

Wealdstone
-11

West Brom

West Ham

Weymouth
-11

Wigan

Wolves

Wycombe

Key
() Missing Artwork
(- 4) Missing 4 Players: Data and Artwork
() Team Complete

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